Category Archives: Long-Haired

Mammals Are Interesting (1953)

Encyclopedia Britannica Films

Synopsis: An educational film all about mammals.

Reality Cats: When the subject of mammals having hair is introduced, footage of a long-haired tabby cat mama with her kittens is shown.

Mammals Are Interesting - tabby kitten cleaning itself

Mammals Are Interesting - tabby kitten looking at camera

Mammals Are Interesting - mama tabby cat with kittens

Mammals Are Interesting - mama tabby cat cleaning kitten

Mammals Are Interesting - mama tabby cat cleaning kitten

Later the discussion of carnivores includes footage of a Siamese cat playing with a ball of string as the narrator explains how they have sharp claws to catch their food.

Mammals Are Interesting - Siamese cat looking at ball of string

Mammals Are Interesting - Siamese cat looking at ball of string

Mammals Are Interesting - Siamese cat playing with ball of string

Final Mewsings: Cats wish they had claws sharp enough to open tuna cans!


Relevant Links:

To discuss this film and other cats in movies and on television, join us on
Facebook and Twitter.


Paulie (1998)

Paulie poster

DreamWorks
Starring:
 Jay Mohr, Hallie Eisenberg
Directed by: John Roberts

Cat Out of the Bag Alert!  This review contains some spoilers for this film!

Synopsis: A parrot named Paulie (voiced by Jay Mohr) becomes the beloved pet of a girl named Marie (Hallie Eisenberg) but when they are separated Paulie goes to great lengths to find her again.

Featured Feline: Marie’s parents are concerned about their daughter’s strong attachment to Paulie, especially when she insists the bird not only talks but understands her (which, of course, he does). Paulie is thrown for a loop when Marie’s father (Matt Craven) brings home a ginger tabby kitten for Marie one day.

Paulie - Marie's father Matt Craven holding up ginger tabby kitten

There is a bit of product placement when the kitten is introduced along with a box of Little Friskie’s cat food.

Paulie - Marie Hallie Eisenberg holding ginger tabby kitten with box of Friskies cat food

The cat (who is never mentioned by name) is next seen full grown (and long-haired). Paulie has to sit up high on a coat rack to avoid the cat.

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat meowing

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat on couch

Paulie calls down to the cat and tells it to go outside. But instead of going out the door, the cat focuses on the bird.

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat looking up

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat standing on floor looking up

The cat climbs up on a chair next to a set table and finally leaps at Paulie on the coat rack, knocking it down and throwing them both onto the table.

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat on chair by table

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat meowing on chair by table

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat leaping towards coat

There is a bit of cartoonish business here where the cat flies across the table under a salad bowl (a fake cat tail was used for this). Jumping off the table, the cat takes chase after Paulie and ends up slipping on a rug and hitting a plate glass door. This action is not extremely harsh, though, and it would appear the cat just lightly bumped against the glass.

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat about to jump off table with onion on ear

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat bumping into glass door

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat turning from glass door

The cat manages to place a paw on Paulie’s tail when Marie arrives and rescues the bird, scolding the cat and telling it to shoo. This scene was achieved by using blue screen to replace the bird trainer’s hand with the cat actor’s paw.

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat with paw on Paulie parrot's tail

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat sitting and looking up

Later the cat is seen beneath Marie’s window as she is trying to coach Paulie to fly. Paulie suggests Marie show him how and as she crawls out of the window she knocks a flower pot down. The cat scurries out of the way as the pot hits the ground. Paulie congratulates Marie on almost hitting the cat.

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat far below window

Paulie - long-haired ginger tabby cat below window

Final Mewsings: Cats don’t care for wise-cracking parrots.


Relevant Links:

IMDb logo  tcmlogo  Amazon logo  Amazon Instant Video logo

To discuss this film and other cats in movies and on television, join us on
Facebook and Twitter.


En man som heter Ove (2015)

A Man Called Ove poster

English Title: A Man Called Ove
Nordisk Film
Starring:
 Rolf Lassgårdm, Bahar Pars
Also Starring:  Magic, Orlando
Directed by: Hannes Holm

Cat Out of the Bag Alert!  This review contains MAJOR spoilers for this film!

Synopsis: Based on the popular novel by Fredrik Backman. Ove (Rolf Lassgårdm) is a cantankerous older man who has reached the point where life doesn’t seem worth living until the people around him see more in him than he sees in himself.

Featured Feline: Ove lives in a housing development with strict association rules which he enforces, even though he is no longer president. He spends much of his time walking around the grounds, taking justice into his own hands when he sees a violation. As he walks around the complex, a female Ragdoll cat often follows him. He tries to scare the cat away but it does not seem to deter the animal. In the book the cat is referred to as “The Cat Annoyance”.

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat sitting on path

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat sitting in foreground with Ove Rolf Lassgårdm in background

A Man Called Ove - Ove Rolf Lassgårdm trying to scare away Ragdoll cat

While Ove does not like the cat, he still comes to the rescue when a woman with a dog (whom he also despises) is caught throwing stones at the poor thing. Ove chases the woman away. He even comes back outside with some food and looks for the cat but it is gone.

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat crouched next to house

One of Ove’s new neighbors is a pregnant woman named Parvaneh (Bahar Pars) who takes a liking to the man even though he is initially very rude to her and her husband. Parvaneh is with Ove when she finds the cat injured outside his door.

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat being picked up by Parvaneh Bahar Pars with Ove Rolf Lassgårdm

Against Ove’s wishes, she insists they take the cat inside his home and that Ove find something to keep the cat warm. At that point a neighbor named Jimmy (Klas Wiljergârd) comes in and takes his shirt off, warming the cat against his chest. When both Parvaneh and Jimmy say they can’t take the cat because of allergies (Parvaneh’s children and Jimmy remembers he himself is allergic) it is clear the care of the cat will fall to Ove.

A Man Called Ove - Jimmy Klas Wiljergârd holding Ragdoll cat against bare chect with Parvaneh Bahar Pars

A Man Called Ove - Jimmy Klas Wiljergârd holding Ragdoll cat against bare chect with Ove Rolf Lassgårdm

Ove reluctantly takes on the responsibility and over time the cat becomes a constant companion.

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat being held by Ove Rolf Lassgårdm

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat lying on floor and looking up

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat lying on bed

Ove even takes the cat with him to visit his wife’s grave.

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat being held by Ove Rolf Lassgårdm at cemetery

Ove also becomes close to many of the residents of the community, helping them when they need him.

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat being watching Ove work

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat watching Ove Rolf Lassgårdm fix bicycle

He even lets a young man named Mirsad (Poyan Karimi) move in with him when he has nowhere else to go.

A Man Called Ove - Mirsad Poyan Karimi feeding Ragdoll cat

Now others, including the cat, follow Ove on his rounds.

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat being and friends following Ove Rolf Lassgårdm on his rounds

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat being and friends following Ove Rolf Lassgårdm on his rounds

Near the end of the film, Parvaneh and her husband find that Ove has passed in his sleep, the cat lying forlornly on the man’s chest.

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat lying on Ove's Rolf Lassgårdm chest with Parvaneh Bahar Pars

The part of the unnamed cat was played by cats Magic and Orlando who were not trained cat actors. According to online sources, Magic’s specialty was the ability to not be scared away easily, a must for this role opposite the frustrated Ove. Orlando was brought in when the cat character needed to stay in one place for a period of time. The cats were so similar that the wrong one was often taken to the set for the wrong actions! In an interview director Hannes Holm explained how the production company originally did not want to include the cat character in the film but he fought for the inclusion, pointing out all the fans of the book who loved the cat.

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat lying on floor

A Man Called Ove - Ragdoll cat lying on bed

Purr Blur:  Just before the final scene in which Ove is found dead, he is driving one of Parvaneh’s daughters in his car. As they travel down a winding road, a black cat crosses in front of the car. Likely a hint of what’s to come.

A Man Called Ove - black cat running across road in front of car

Final Mewsings: It’s a shame that a movie with such a positive feline character felt the need to throw in a stereotypical black cat bad omen.


Relevant Links:

IMDb logo  tcmlogo  Amazon logo  Blu Ray logo  Amazon Instant Video logo

To discuss this film and other cats in movies and on television, join us on
Facebook and Twitter.


Night of the Eagle (1962)

Night of the Eagle DVD

Also Known As:  Burn, Witch, Burn
Warner Bros.
Starring:
 Janet Blair, Peter Wyngarde, Margaret Johnston, Anthony Nicholls
Directed by: Sidney Hayers

Synopsis: Teacher Norman Taylor is a staunch skeptic (Peter Wyngarde), so when he suspects his wife Tansy (Janet Blair) has been practicing witchcraft he insists her fears of curses against them are unfounded and makes her stop. But when things start to spiral out of control in their lives he begins to doubt his faith in logic.

Kitty Cameo: A beautiful long-haired black cat lives in the Taylor’s home and is seen in several scenes.

Night of the Eagle - black cat sitting on stairs

Night of the Eagle - black cat sitting on desk

When Norman forces Tansy to burn her witchcrafting materials he waits until the end to burn the spider she keeps in an ivory box. As soon as the ornate box hits the flames the cat, which is sitting on a chair nearby, starts to hiss and screech and then runs from the room.

Night of the Eagle - black cat watching from chair

Later on the cat is instrumental (although seen only briefly, and thrown from offscreen as well) in a final evil spell against the Taylors.

Night of the Eagle - black cat screeching on chair

Final Mewsings: Never burn an ivory box decorated with skulls in front of a cat.  They may just set your house on fire later.


Relevant Links:

IMDb logo  tcmlogo  Amazon logo

To discuss this film and other cats in movies and on television, join us on
Facebook and Twitter.


June Lockhart and her swimming cat, George

“What Do You Know?  George is a Swimmer!”
Thus proclaimed ad copy accompanying some photos taken for an Associated Press piece at the home of actress June Lockhart in April 1963 of her pet cat, George, who apparently enjoyed taking a dip in the Lockhart family pool. AP Photographer David F. Smith was on hand to snap images of June and George as they swam about the pool.

June Lockhart and her swimming cat George

This copy accompanied the above photo:

HOLLYWOOD – April 24, 1963 – George, a cat owned by actress June Lockhart and her family, goes for a swim yesterday with his owner in the family pool in Hollywood. George is one of five cats owned by the actress and her husband, architect John Lindsay, and their two daughters. The youngsters were instrumental in getting George’s feet wet for the first time. Now he seems to enjoy a daily dip in the pool with the family. Miss Lockhart plays the role of the mother in the television series, ‘Lassie,’ which goes into its eighth year on the air next season.” (AP Wirephoto)

June’s other cats were named Jenny, Lavinia, Charlie and Tusla Ruby (a stray they picked up in Tulsa, Oklahoma.)

Most newspapers ran the photo with an abbreviated version of the story, such as this:

April 25, 1963 – George, the swimming cat, enjoys a dip in the pool and even lets actress June Lockhart paddle along with him. Miss Lockhart claims title to the Hollywood pool, but she and George both know it really belongs to him.

Later that year, the Sarasota Herald-Tribune ran a longer story about George in their June 15th issue:

CAT LIKES WARM POOL
June Lockhart’s Feline Wins Swimming Contest
By Joseph Finnegan

    HOLLYWOOD (UPI) – We had a swimming race with June Lockhart’s aquatic cat “George” the other day and lost.
      George seemed like a pussy cat possessed as he streaked along the water, all four paws feverishly clawing up a wake.
      It’s not easy to lose gracefully to a swimming feline, but it should be pointed out that Miss Lockhart’s cat gets plenty of practice in the actress’ hot water pool.
      Most humans don’t have a hot water pool, let alone a cat.
      George, a two-year-old cat with a hint of Persian in his background and little else, is the pride of Miss Lockhart’s household zoo which consists of two dogs and four other kitties who don’t dare go near the water.
      They look at George with stars in their eyes, not to mention a bit of wonderment when he joins June for a paddle around the pool.
      “I’m sure George could go the whole length of this 45-foot pool if he paced himself,” bragged Miss Lockhart as she dried off the winner.
      “George’s motivation is quite simple. He wants to get on the other side. That’s the same with all of us.”
      Miss Lockhart, who plays the mother on CBS-TV’s “Lassie,” said the cat’s swimming victory marked its debut in competition.
      “I don’t know what we call his stroke,” she said. “It’s certainly not the dog paddle. I guess you could call it the cat paddle. This was his first freestyle open competition. Actually, though, George is nothing with his backstroke.”
      The pretty actress, wearing a fetching black bathing suit, joined George for his first race. The cat was understandably nervous when he saw a photographer alongside the pool waiting to record the winner.
George might be a good swimmer, but Miss Lockhart admitted he’s no good as a mouse catcher.
      That’s probably because he spends all his time hanging around the pool.
      One fact is certain, Miss Lockhart has the most mouse free swimming pool in Hollywood.

Another photo shows June drying off George with a hair dryer after the swim:

June Lockhart and her swimming cat George

Click here to see more of David F. Smith’s images from the photo shoot on Corbis Images

To discuss this film and other cats in movies and on television, join us on
Facebook and Twitter.